The Settle - Carlisle Railway

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Langwathby

Langwathby

The Station

Langwathby is an unmanned station having a waiting room on each platform.

Langwathby Station Café is in the northbound station buildings and is open Wednesday to Sunday 10.30-4.30pm.

The Weather Right Now

Mostly Cloudy
Today
30/09
Mostly Cloudy
High 13° / Low 6°
Chance of Rain
Tomorrow
01/10
Chance of Rain
High 13° / Low 4°
Partly Cloudy
Sunday
02/10
Partly Cloudy
High 14° / Low 6°

The Local Area

A large village green occupies the centre of Langwathby and is bordered by cottages, farmhouses and a pub. The Great North Air Ambulance, Cumbrian base is also located by Langwathby station.

Langwathby is also famous for a scarecrow festival, which has taken place annually since 2004 and is usually held sometime in July. There is also a May Day event held each year in Langwathby which includes Maypole dancing from the village children, fancy dress, a Brass Band, entertainment, stalls, rides and much more. For a small village Langwathby certainly has a lot to offer.

Not far from Langwathby are Long Meg and her daughters, also known as Maughanby Circle. Long Meg and her daughters is a Bronze Age stone circle and is the third largest stone circle in England. Long Meg herself is a 12’ high piece of sandstone, on which are carved spiral patterns, thought to be at least 4,500 years old. The circle was probably used for rituals associated with the changing of seasons, the setting midwinter sun is aligned with the column stone of Long Meg. The circle itself is composed of 59 stones with only 27 of those- standing which is a significant decrease from the original 70 stones. The largest of the remaining stones weighs in at a hefty 29 tons. In addition to the circle itself- are the legends associated with it. Local folklore says that the stones were a coven of witches who were holding a sabbat, some time in the thirteenth century. Michael Scot, a wizard from Scotland, found them so engaged and cast a spell over the assembled country, turning them all into stones. It is said that the stones are uncountable – the legend says that if anyone does manage to count all stones twice in a row, the spell will be undone. Another legend, unique to this site; it is said that if Long Meg herself was damaged, she would begin to bleed.

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